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Storytime Bilingüe featuring “Baby Teeth/Dientes de bebe”

 Teething is probably the hardest milestone for baby and family to go through. From birth until 36 months old, little ones endure the pain and suffering of 20 emerging teeth! So this week, we dedicate our story to Mateo, who is in the process of having both his upper lateral incisors and canine baby teeth coming in. He is such a strong trouper, and once those four teeth fully emerge, his total teeth count will be up to 11!

Little ones love looking at pictures of other babies, so what better way to practice counting skills in English and Spanish than to count the little teeth in these precious baby smiles? And at the end of the book, there's also a page with toothy tips and things to try to get your kids excited about caring for their teeth. 

Teeth are actually a funny subject in our house, because both Maya and Mateo were born with teeth. Maya's fell out before we left the hospital, and Teo's just disappeared one day. They both were early teethers, too, and received their first tooth at three months old. Maya didn't have another tooth come in until she was 11 months old, so she looked like a little jack-o-lantern for most of her infancy, and Teo started getting the rest of his teeth around 8 months. Soon, they will both have complete smiles! 



Here's a chart to see when baby teeth usually emerge... looks like Mateo is right on schedule!


And here's a photo of my little jack-o-lanterns. Can you guess which one is Maya and which is Mateo?


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